✓ Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss || ✓ PDF Read by É Philip Carlo
Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM By Philip Carlo

Anthony Gaspipe Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 years at a federal prison in Colorado Now, for the first time, the head of a mob family has granted complete and total access to a journalist Casso has given New York Times bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate, personal look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen TAnthony Gaspipe Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 years at a federal prison in Colorado Now, for the first time, the head of a mob family has granted complete and total access to a journalist Casso has given New York Times bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate, personal look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen This is his shocking story.From birth, Anthony Casso s mob life was preordained Michael Casso introduced his young son around South Brooklyn s social clubs, where men of honor did business by shaking pinkie ringed hands hands equally at home pilfering stolen goods from the Brooklyn docks or gripping the cold steel of a silenced pistol Young Anthony watched and listened and decided that he would devote his life to crime.Casso would prove his talent for earning, concocting ingenious schemes to hijack trucks, rob banks, and bring into New York vast quantities of cocaine, marijuana, and heroin Casso also had an uncanny ability to work with the other Mafia families, and he forged unusually strong ties with the Russian mob By the time Casso took the reins of the Lucchese family, he was a seasoned boss, a very dangerous man.It was a great life Casso and his beautiful wife, Lillian, had money to burn Casso and his crew brought in so much cash that he had dozens of large safe deposit boxes filled with bricks of hundred dollar bills But the law finally caught up with him in his New Jersey safe house in 1994 Rather than stoically face the music like the old time mafiosi he revered, Casso became the thing he most hated a rat It broke his family s heart and made the once feared and revered mobster an object of scorn and disgust among his former friends For it turned out that a lifetime of street smarts completely failed him in dealing with a group even cunning and ruthless than the Mafia the U.S government.Detailing Casso s feud with John Gotti and their attempts to kill each other, the Windows Case that led to the beginning of the end for the mob in New York, and Casso s dealings with decorated NYPD officers Lou Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa the Mafia cops Gaspipe is the inside story of one man s rise and fall, mirroring the rise and fall of a way of life, a roller coaster ride into a netherworld few outsiders have ever dared to enter.
  • Title: Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss
  • Author: Philip Carlo
  • ISBN: 9780061429842
  • Page: 233
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

Opiated Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
This book should have been titled Gaspipe: Delusions of a Mafia Boss. That is how it reads. This is Casso's version of events during his reign as a deranged mobster. Murder after murder and crime after crime are justified as something Casso just had to do because he was a 'man's man'. When other mafiosi turn informants they are rats. When Casso turns informant he is using the FBI as an 'electrician uses a wire' as a means to an end.Philip Carlo's writing leaves a lot to be desired. I lost count [...]
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Hayes Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
15/100Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss is basically 300+ pages dedicated to idolising a cold-hearted killer. I got 120 pages in before I started skipping chapters to see if the content or style was any different, before finally giving up on the book. The author worships Casso at every opportunity, just as he attempts to justify every one of his violent deeds to the audience. Carlo spends more time talking up Casso than explaining his life, which leads to a very repetitive book. All of the ch [...]
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Keri Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
The writing style was repetitive and extremely amateur (simple spelling errors, abrupt tone changes, stretched metaphors, etc). I generally like books about the mafia, but Carlo managed to make this one quite boring - which is hard to do with a mafia story! Also, he clearly has a slanted view of Casso so that everything he did is slanted as "just business," "clever strategy," "manly," or "his culture". It would have been much more interesting to hear about him as a human being with all the quirk [...]
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Austin Durling Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Loved this book. Couldn't put it down! Philip Carlo is one of my favourite true crime authors, hands down.
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Lisa Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
After virtually all of my family became obsessed by The Iceman (which I still haven't read), they went on a bit of a Philip Carlo mission, which is how I came to be handed this (and also, probably due to my love of The Sopranos).I found this to be an interesting, matter-of-fact, yet flawed and occasionally repetitive account of how Anthony 'Gaspipe' Casso, former underboss of the Luchese family, came to rise through the ranks of La Cosa Nostra and meet his ultimate fate, to be played out behind [...]
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Nathaniel Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
This is a biography of Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso, one of the most influential figures in the 20th century Italian Mafia, written by some random guy who grew up next door to him. I will start by saying that Carlo was far from a good writer. Very far. It's obvious that this book was written piecemeal with minimal editing and then combined. He alternates calling Casso "Anthony", "Casso", or "Gaspipe" repeatedly, often in the same paragraph, and often awkwardly calls him "Anthony Gaspipe Casso" at ina [...]
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Rick Boyer Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Actually, this book gets 3.75 stars. It's really well written, fascinating, informative, and a window into the secret and violent world of the American Mafia. The book is enhanced by the fact that the author, Philip Carlo, and his family were personal friends of the Casso family so there is some personal insight here that you might not get elsewhere.On the other hand, that personal relationship at times seems to make Carlo want to present Gaspipe Casso as a sympathetic figure a guy who told the [...]
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Dave Gaston Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Carlo stole part of my life from me, he should go to jail with Gaspipe for the hours I lost. I blame the author and the sensational killer that he interviewed (and OK maybe I blame myself a little). His book represents mafia bravado at it most expected and therefore it’s most mundane. Yes, yes he serves up the sizzle and I suppose that is exactly why I morbidly wanted to read another true crime NY Mafia confession. Carlo details a life long murder spree for hire, a series of double crosses, m [...]
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Joseph Andolino Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Really liked the story. Cool to hear about his human side along with the animal involved in all of the criminal activities. It seems as though he really laid everything out there. If he really did try to get the laws attention in regards to future terrorist activity and it was ignored, it sucks. Great read!
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Andy Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Pretty weak. How can you screw up with such interesting subject matter? I think this might have been my favorite book ever if I was still 14 years old. The author doesn't really try to hide his man-crush on Anthony Casso and it gets pretty old. Some of the writing is just painfully amateur.
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Alyssa Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
2.5The subject of "Gaspipe" is quite interesting, but I was not a fan of Carlo's writing. This is my second book by Carlo, and, like the first, it had a strong element of self-aggrandizement. Carlo makes sure the reader know that he's personally connected with his subject. Also like the first, it was overly repetitive. There were about ten words and phrases which were used far too often. For example, just about every man in the book was described as a "stone cold killer" or "psychopath." Yes, wh [...]
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Spauldsy Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
This book felt like the author was trying to impress Gaspipe by almost romanticizing his story throughout the book. He described him as the "best shot" or biggest money earner in the mob. Gaspipe knew the author and his family so I think that may have tainted his view a bit.I also thought he tried to get too poetic in some parts. Personally I don't like when an author does that, especially when describing someone torturing someone else. Specific details of what happened is strong enough, there's [...]
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John McDonald Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Anthony Casso was a good looking young Italian guy whose mother and father, a hardworking guy who knew some of the Bensonhurst locals, could have chosen a different life but didn't. His nickname "Gaspipe" does not underestimate the horror this man could inflict with a pipe installed at his leg used during 1950s rumbles with other Brooklyn gangs. Casso became what he is, and so be that. At times, the author, who publicly admitted that Casso was a psychopath, seems to want us to believe that Casso [...]
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D Syman Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Didn't strike me as all that well-written and I had trouble getting into it. I usually like this genre but this one didn't do it for me. It was "ok".
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Steve Kemp Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Fantastic book . I still think "Night Stalker " was Phil Carlo's best book , but he has a great style that pulls you in to all of his books .
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Lee Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
When reading this book you have to take two things in mind first this book is Gaspipe Casso’s point of view. The other is that the author used to live next door to Casso and lets him tell his point of view without really questioning it. This tells the story of the infamous Luchesse Boss/Underboss Gaspipe Casso. It details his rise up the mob ladder from his youth cumulating in him being one of most popular mob figures in NYC. It also follows his fall how after being caught he ended up turning [...]
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George Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
INTERESTING, CAPTIVATING READING.“…a sandwich at a luncheonette.”—page 54There’s a word that triggered memories: ‘luncheonette’. Do they even still have luncheonettes in the twenty-first century? Did they ever use that word outside of the New York City metropolitan area? The last time I had “a sandwich at a luncheonette” must have been in the late 1950s; probably in Jersey City, New Jersey.I’ll admit I was leery about reading a book with the word “Confessions” in the titl [...]
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Ben Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
A fascinating, informative biography written by one of my favourite crime authors: Philip Carlo. Carlo allows the reader to delve into the life of Anthony 'Gaspipe' Casso at length to examine the neurotic, criminal mastermind up close, displaying both his flawed, sadistic and barbaric side along with his family-orientated, loving and paternal side.However, there are a few negative comments I need to get off of my chest: primarily the fact that there are so many errors and simple spelling mistake [...]
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Steven Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
I found this a difficult book to rate. The writing was repetitive at times. The ending felt rushed. It also seemed as if much of the details in the ending were left out. For example, there was a reference to an event that was never described beyond that reference. At times I was irritated by the book's tone, which tended to support the criminal, but this is common to these stories, which tend to be told from the subject's point of view. The full horror of the subject's actions, the impact on peo [...]
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Don Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
This is a good overview of the 90s mafia wars from the Lucchese family side of things. Most of the press and the books I've read concentrate on the Gambinos. Obviously, Anthony Casso *Gaspipe") is far from a reliable witness to his own crimes--although it's hard to think he could have made up anything worse than the murders and mutilations depicted here. The indictment of the FBI rings true in that they refused to use much of Casso's testimony because it contradicted the testimony of their previ [...]
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Tim Jin Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
After reading The Ice Man: Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer, a few years ago, I was looking forward for more Philip Carlo's writing, but it seems like he is one hit wonder with The Ice Man. The author doesn't really go in depth with Gaspipe and his other book, The Butcher. Unlike his first debut best seller (Richard Kuklinski's story), it seems like he wrote the two latter books just because to fulfill his contract with the publisher . Unlike The Ice Man, there is no compelling reason to r [...]
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Sarah Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
h my god, I am still unsure why I read this the whole way through. It was awful - repetitious, filled with bad attempts at street language, and a narrative that kept tripping over itself. Maybe it would have worked better if it was a novella, because with the number of times that certain facts were repeated over and over again makes me think that there simply wasn't enough material there to make an entire book. And man, some of the assumptions he makes to try to fill in the characters of the peo [...]
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Mark Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
While we all have our thoughts on the mafia and what they do this book will open your eyes to the competitiveness and brutality between the 'houses'.Author Carlo grew up next door to the boy who was to become gaspipe. Rival street gangs of Irish and Italian youths and increased criminal activity lead to a life in one of New York ' s leading Mafia families. A standover man and gun for hire he works his way to the top where life should be sweet. Many women and millions of dollars, a loving wife an [...]
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Matt Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Good book. Based on the direct confessions of Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso. His version including admitions of dozens of murders. Turned states' witness only to be less than useful as a phsychopath. Feels he got screwed. I did not enjoy as much as Iceman and this had a far different feel. Casso seems pretty delusional, and this is told largely from his perspective. I liked this book overall and I like Carlo's work. Casso is a combination of stone cold phsychopath,and mafia leader. I would put this be [...]
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Luke Farris Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
I liked the book because it talked about how he grew up. He learned about the streets at a young age. He was a wise mobster in the beginning. He followed his orders and he was an outstanding earner for the Lucchese's.He respected the old way of La Cosa Nostra. He had so many cops and FBI agents in his pocket too, he was one of the strongest people in the mob, but he was not a boss because he turned it down to Vic. He just stayed as an underboss. He started to get paranoid about who was going to [...]
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Alex Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
A really good book, although I have to say I liked his other book that I previously read, "The Ice Man, Confessions of a Mafia Contract Killer" somewhat better. Although the book did tend to always shine Casso in a good light, no matter the situation (most likely due to the author's relationship with Casso), the facts did all seem to be accurate and it was an enjoyable book to read. It had very short chapters which I love (always close to a stopping point), and was written almost like a fiction [...]
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Russell Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
A quick and easy read, but not Carlo's best work. While he doesn't make apologies for Casso's nonsense, he does largely portray him as a victim of circumstances and environment. Carlo spends more time pointing out the indisputably corrupt workings of the government, rather than pointing out just how morally bankrupt Casso and organized crime is to those it victimizes. Apparently Carlo knows the Casso family and his bias clearly shows.2 stars, only because of an impartiality to the Mafia genre, b [...]
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Mike Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Another stroke job book written by a mobster who tries to save his own ass by ratting on his associates. Just like every book written by these greased guinas they go through the whole book saying how they hate rats and everyone loved them then in the end they turn on there friends. Anthony Casso was one of the top Luchesse crime family bosses (The same crime family that Goodfellas was written about). He ended up getting screwed by the government on his plea deal which I find pretty funny and he [...]
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Geoffrey Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Interesting story with a typical mob ending (dead or in jail). Casso is shed in a mostly positive light as seen through the eyes of an author who at one point lived next to him. While he did some dark things during his "career", in typical government fashion, he was promised amnesty in exchange for "song" but ended up receiving a ridiculous sentence and was held with some of the most notorious criminals of the modern day (in the US). This is an easy and enjoyable mob read and also provides some [...]
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Avi Nov 18, 2019 - 08:51 AM
Easy to read, short chapters, and very interesting, although the end of the book tended to drag a little, and overall the book tended to be repetitive. It is also intersting how the author paints the book's main character as a stand up guy, while the vast majorty of his adversaries are described as crazy, psychopaths, etc. In this way, the book was clearly one-sided. With that said, it is a very good read, a gripping story, and highly recommended. I give it an 8 on a scale of 1-10.
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Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss By Philip Carlo Anthony Gaspipe Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 years at a federal prison in Colorado Now, for the first time, the head of a mob family has granted complete and total access to a journalist Casso has given New York Times bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate, personal look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen TAnthony Gaspipe Casso is currently serving thirteen consecutive life sentences plus 455 years at a federal prison in Colorado Now, for the first time, the head of a mob family has granted complete and total access to a journalist Casso has given New York Times bestselling author Philip Carlo the most intimate, personal look into the world of La Cosa Nostra ever seen This is his shocking story.From birth, Anthony Casso s mob life was preordained Michael Casso introduced his young son around South Brooklyn s social clubs, where men of honor did business by shaking pinkie ringed hands hands equally at home pilfering stolen goods from the Brooklyn docks or gripping the cold steel of a silenced pistol Young Anthony watched and listened and decided that he would devote his life to crime.Casso would prove his talent for earning, concocting ingenious schemes to hijack trucks, rob banks, and bring into New York vast quantities of cocaine, marijuana, and heroin Casso also had an uncanny ability to work with the other Mafia families, and he forged unusually strong ties with the Russian mob By the time Casso took the reins of the Lucchese family, he was a seasoned boss, a very dangerous man.It was a great life Casso and his beautiful wife, Lillian, had money to burn Casso and his crew brought in so much cash that he had dozens of large safe deposit boxes filled with bricks of hundred dollar bills But the law finally caught up with him in his New Jersey safe house in 1994 Rather than stoically face the music like the old time mafiosi he revered, Casso became the thing he most hated a rat It broke his family s heart and made the once feared and revered mobster an object of scorn and disgust among his former friends For it turned out that a lifetime of street smarts completely failed him in dealing with a group even cunning and ruthless than the Mafia the U.S government.Detailing Casso s feud with John Gotti and their attempts to kill each other, the Windows Case that led to the beginning of the end for the mob in New York, and Casso s dealings with decorated NYPD officers Lou Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa the Mafia cops Gaspipe is the inside story of one man s rise and fall, mirroring the rise and fall of a way of life, a roller coaster ride into a netherworld few outsiders have ever dared to enter.

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  • ✓ Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss || ✓ PDF Read by É Philip Carlo
    233 Philip Carlo
  • thumbnail Title: ✓ Gaspipe: Confessions of a Mafia Boss || ✓ PDF Read by É Philip Carlo
    Posted by:Philip Carlo
    Published :2019-08-27T08:51:25+00:00