[PDF] ↠ Unlimited ↠ Gullah Culture in America : by Wilbur Cross ✓
Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM By Wilbur Cross

In 1989, 1998, and 2005, fifteen Gullah speakers went to Sierra Leone and other parts of West Africa to trace their origins and ancestry Their journey frames this exploration of the extraordinary history of the Gullah culture characterized by strong African cultural retention and a direct influence on American culture, particularly in the South described in this fascinatiIn 1989, 1998, and 2005, fifteen Gullah speakers went to Sierra Leone and other parts of West Africa to trace their origins and ancestry Their journey frames this exploration of the extraordinary history of the Gullah culture characterized by strong African cultural retention and a direct influence on American culture, particularly in the South described in this fascinating book Since long before the Revolution, America has had hidden pockets of a bygone African culture with a language of its own, and long endowed with traditions, language, design, medicine, agriculture, fishing, hunting, weaving, and the arts This book explores the Gullah culture s direct link to Africa, via the sea islands of the American southeast.The first published evidence of Gullah went almost unrecorded until the 1860s, when missionaries from Philadelphia made their way, even as the Civil War was at its height, to St Helena Island, South Carolina, to establish a small institution called Penn School to help freed slaves learn how to read and write and make a living in a world of upheaval and distress There they noticed that most of the islanders spoke a language that was only part English, tempered with expressions and idioms, often spoken in a melodious, euphonic manner, accompanied by distinctive practices in religion, work, dancing, greetings, and the arts The homogeneity, richness, and consistency of this culture was possible because the sea islanders were isolated Even today, there are than 300,000 Gullah people, many of whom speak little or no English, living in the remoter areas of the sea islands of St Helena, Edisto, Coosay, Ossabaw, Sapelo, Daufuskie, and Cumberland Gullah Culture in America explores not only the history of Gullah, but takes the reader behind the scenes of Gullah culture today to show what it s like to grow up, live, and celebrate in this remarkable and uniquely American community.
  • Title: Gullah Culture in America
  • Author: Wilbur Cross
  • ISBN: 9780275994501
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

Jerry Wendt Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
This is a historical account of the Gullah population on the barrier islands off the Carolinas. Originally populated by slaves the land was inhospitable and trying but settlement thrived with determination. This book is an excellent adjunct to "Daughters of the Dust," a novel based on the film of the same name giving account of a dynasty of settlers. This book, gives the real backstory that I used to understand this important and neglected part of American history. This is a scholarly book , not [...]
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Vanessa Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
This was very informative. It was more than I wanted to read for an initial understanding of the Gullah Culture and to know more for our display for Black History month. Mr. Cross has a great deal of knowledge.
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Valarie Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
While there is some good information in this book, digging it out is an exercise in drudgery. It would appear that the author wrote this book in stages, and forgot to review the text as a whole to make sure that nothing was redundant. As it is, many paragraphs are repeated, almost verbatim, throughout the book, as if Cross forgot that he already explained [the Penn Center's founding, etc.]. The chapter on musical traditions doesn't even focus on Gullah music, but is simply an overview of African [...]
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Wendi Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
I really enjoyed this book. Despite a fair bit of redundancy throughout, I learned so much about the Gullah that I hadn't known. I had learned of the Gullah/ Geechee many years ago in my linguistics studies, and had encountered the sweetbasket weavers in SC, but wanted to know so much more---but I truly had no idea of their real history. This book provided me with what I feel is a very solid foundation of knowledge about their history, elements that have kept them together through tumultuous tim [...]
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L.J. Stephens Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
This is a great Gullah 101 lessons for many. The Gullah cuture is hardly known and rapidly diminishing. This is SC history! These wonderful individuals are the backbone of Coastal Carolina. This book helps color the vivid and rich history of the Gullah living & dialect, the thick Soul Food southern cooking, the mystical & haunting religious beliefs, and how they made what SC's history is today! All South Carolina enthusiast, African American studies scholars, and anyone warning to learn [...]
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Megan Oct 14, 2019 - 07:06 AM
Read the required chapters for my course (Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 12). It's a lot of other people's quotes. Informative, but not engaging to read.
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Gullah Culture in America By Wilbur Cross In 1989, 1998, and 2005, fifteen Gullah speakers went to Sierra Leone and other parts of West Africa to trace their origins and ancestry Their journey frames this exploration of the extraordinary history of the Gullah culture characterized by strong African cultural retention and a direct influence on American culture, particularly in the South described in this fascinatiIn 1989, 1998, and 2005, fifteen Gullah speakers went to Sierra Leone and other parts of West Africa to trace their origins and ancestry Their journey frames this exploration of the extraordinary history of the Gullah culture characterized by strong African cultural retention and a direct influence on American culture, particularly in the South described in this fascinating book Since long before the Revolution, America has had hidden pockets of a bygone African culture with a language of its own, and long endowed with traditions, language, design, medicine, agriculture, fishing, hunting, weaving, and the arts This book explores the Gullah culture s direct link to Africa, via the sea islands of the American southeast.The first published evidence of Gullah went almost unrecorded until the 1860s, when missionaries from Philadelphia made their way, even as the Civil War was at its height, to St Helena Island, South Carolina, to establish a small institution called Penn School to help freed slaves learn how to read and write and make a living in a world of upheaval and distress There they noticed that most of the islanders spoke a language that was only part English, tempered with expressions and idioms, often spoken in a melodious, euphonic manner, accompanied by distinctive practices in religion, work, dancing, greetings, and the arts The homogeneity, richness, and consistency of this culture was possible because the sea islanders were isolated Even today, there are than 300,000 Gullah people, many of whom speak little or no English, living in the remoter areas of the sea islands of St Helena, Edisto, Coosay, Ossabaw, Sapelo, Daufuskie, and Cumberland Gullah Culture in America explores not only the history of Gullah, but takes the reader behind the scenes of Gullah culture today to show what it s like to grow up, live, and celebrate in this remarkable and uniquely American community.

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  • [PDF] ↠ Unlimited ↠ Gullah Culture in America : by Wilbur Cross ✓
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    Posted by:Wilbur Cross
    Published :2019-07-27T07:06:51+00:00