[PDF] · Unlimited Ý Filthy Lucre: Economics for People Who Hate Capitalism : by Joseph Heath ì
Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM By Joseph Heath

Economics is haunted by fallacies than any other study known to man Henry Hazlitt, Economics in One Lesson 1946 Every day economic claims are used by the media or in conversation to support social and political positions Those on the left tend to distrust economists, seeing them as friends of the right There is something to this, since professional economist Economics is haunted by fallacies than any other study known to man Henry Hazlitt, Economics in One Lesson 1946 Every day economic claims are used by the media or in conversation to support social and political positions Those on the left tend to distrust economists, seeing them as friends of the right There is something to this, since professional economists are almost all keen supporters of the free market Yet while factions on the right naturally embrace economists, they also tend to overestimate the effect of their support on free market policies The result is widespread confusion In fact, virtually all commonly held beliefs about economics whether espoused by political activists, politicians, journalists or taxpayers are just plain wrong.Professor Joseph Heath wants to raise our economic literacy and empower us with new ideas In Economics Without Illusions, he draws on everyday examples to skewer the six favourite economic fallacies of the right, followed by impaling the six favourite fallacies of the left Heath leaves no sacred cows untipped as he breaks down complex arguments and shows how the world really works The popularity of such books as Freakonomics and Predictably Irrational demonstrates that people want a better understanding of the financial forces that affect them Highly readable, cogently argued and certain to raise ire along all points of the socio political spectrum, Economics Without Illusions offers readers the economic literacy they need to genuinely understand and critique the pros and cons of capitalism.
  • Title: Filthy Lucre: Economics for People Who Hate Capitalism
  • Author: Joseph Heath
  • ISBN: 9781554683956
  • Page: 419
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

Trevor Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
It was the subtitle of this book that got me in – ‘Economics for those who hate capitalism’. I’ve been reading a few books lately that have been economics for those who love capitalism and I was hoping that this would take to task some of the fundamental assumptions of free market economics and present some way forward for people who are sick of seeing obscene amounts of social product go into increasingly fewer hands while large numbers of the world’s population have nothing or, if th [...]
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Ian "Marvin" Graye Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
A Contribution to the Critique of Political EconomyWhat we now call Economics was once, at the time of Marx, called Political Economy.One of the major achievements of this book is to reveal just how much political philosophy sits behind Economics, and vice versa.The book is written from the perspective of the Left. Well, a Left.It reflects a reasonable level of economic literacy. It acknowledges past errors on the part of both the author and the Left, and seeks to remedy them. In the words of on [...]
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Szplug Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Joseph Heath debunks the myths of modern capitalism, hoping that, by doing so, this book's readers will gain an understanding of economics without the illusions that arise from tendentiousness and/or wrongful intuition: a bit of filthy lucre wherein we better grasp the lucre itself, as well as why the grime accumulates, how we occasionally mistake the lucre as being grimy, and that washing off the grime doesn't always cleanse the lucre.Heath is a lefty himself from way back, and one who, as he n [...]
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Marco Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Economics without Illusions is a rare case of "myth-busting" book that actually does its intended job, rather than simply exposing a contrarian position as if it were divine revelation. Writing from a Leftist position, the author starts by showing how some positions traditionally associated with Conservative politics (even if the author is a bit too prone to lump everybody outside of the Left tent, blurring some relevant policy distinctions with a convenient label) are not a natural consequence [...]
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Westcoastsusan Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
So it turns out that 'hyperbolic discounting' is not actually an annoying debate technique but rather a description of the universal human tendency to over-weight near term costs and to over-discount long term ones.We already know this about ourselves. We don't stick to our own virtuous long term plans; Yeah, we're better at it as older adults than we were as teenagers, but we 'sign up to show up' and lock ourselves in to accountability because we know; We know the power of appetite; We know tha [...]
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Suhrob Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
There is a chance that one could rate a book like this high just because one agrees with it. I do agree with vast majority that is said here, but even if I try to account for this bias I still think it is an incredibly worthwhile read and arguably there is genuine attempt to be balanced (there are 6 fallacies both for left and right). Don't get turned off by the sensationalist title, this is a well thought through, reasonable discussion. Heath might suffer a bit of hindsight smugness, some point [...]
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Nick Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This is a "landmark" book which anyone on the political "Right" and, especially anyone on the political "Left" should read. The author challenged, and in many cases destroyed my economic assumptions. Heath is a very witty, intelligent and, when need be, blunt writer, who isn't afraid to tell it like he sees it and back up his points logically. His being a philosopher first, instead of an economist or activist enabled a relatively balanced book, and produced a paradigm of constructive critical th [...]
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Kevin Vejrup Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
The book is written by a Canadian philosopher. It scrutinizes economic arguments in the political debate. It does so without any technical difficulties, and by very well formulated and intuitive argumentation.Interesting that paper recycling can reduce amount of trees, as vegetarians reduce cow population, and that car safety increases cancer due prolonged life expectancy. Ch. 1 explains the fallacies of libertarianism in extreme form, that is why we need a government. Ch. 2 claims that economis [...]
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Rachel Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
I finally finished! And it only took almost three months! I learned a lot from this book, although I've probably already forgotten a significant proportion of it. The book mostly puts forth good explanations of broad economic theories and truths/falsehoods, but he also explains some specific things, too. For example, I now have a much better handle on the current economic/housing crisis.
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Craig Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
A very simplified overview of the field of economics. With critiques of both left and right wing economic policies and theories. A fascinating and humorous introduction for a chap like myself who knows virtually nothing about economics. I'll probably read it agin some day to remind myself.
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Jack Oughton Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This made me rethink quite a few things I'd taken for granted in economics. I'm not sure how true a lot of the statements he makes are, but the fact it makes you re-examine your commonly held micro/macro-economic beliefs makes it worth a read. Quite interesting
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Mesha Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Must read - Very accessible & fairly reviewed account of both the "right" and "left" hand takes on Capitalism.
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Tessa Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
I think I am nearly the ideal target audience for this book, as I'm someone who really wants to understand economic theory but am often put off by the yay-markets-boo-government tone of many introductory texts. I felt Heath gave clear and engaging examples covering a wide variety of economic topics. The structure of the book, which addresses popular economic fallacies on the right and the left in turn, really helped point towards the areas where I tend to get economics wrong.Some particularly in [...]
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Eustacia Tan Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Ever since I've come to Japan, I've started to believe that some books are meant to be bought. Books that are meant to be bought will always be on the shelf when you return - like this book. I didn't know if I wanted to buy the book, but after thinking over it, I really wanted it, and was so happy when I went back a few weeks later and found it on the shelf.This book aims to show why the favourite views of the Right and Left (the American Right and Left political views that is), are both wrong. [...]
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Jeff Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This book is intended for people on the left interested in social justice or politics who dislike capitalism, economics and the market without really understanding how the market works. Joseph Heath is a moral and political philosopher from the left himself, frustrated with the lack of understanding among other leftists and how it leads the left to propose solutions that are unrealistic or certain to fail.But it really works as a primer on economics for anyone interested in politics or making th [...]
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Alexander Weber Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This book is really great, especially for someone like myself. I think that the subtitle is a little misleading. It's economics for everyone. The book is divided into six fallacies the right always make about economics, and six fallacies the left always makes. I have to admit I found reading it challenging, in a good way. That it, it wasn't hard to read, it just made me question things I believed were rooted in firm reasoning.Several things I didn't like about Heath's style: he comes off as cond [...]
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Dragos Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
A must read for anybody that has not benefited from an education in both economics and philosophy Heath's book is a page turner. Initially called Filthy Lucre: Economics for People who Hate Capitalism it is sort of an ex-Marxist's (but still centre-leftist's) appeal for people on the fringe to take a good look at both capitalism and economics in a new light but it works just as well at debunking the fallacies of the conservative/libertarian right, trying to bring confused Atlas Shrugged worshipp [...]
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Zachary Jacobi Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
A solidly decent book, although I think hamstrung a bit by its structure. It's seems fairly clear to me that Heath's real purpose with the book is to argue against leftist economic fallacies (god only knows our movement needs this!). Even though they come first, the right wing fallacies section felt like somewhat of an afterthought. It was still fascinating and engaging, but it seemed like it wasn't where his heart was.I spotted one factual error in the book (although it was probably correct at [...]
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BC Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
I fit the profile the author describes quite well - someone without much background in economics or in math. I like to think that I avoid the thought-traps Heath describes, but am sure I fall into them from time to time. I really liked the way the book describes the facile ways many people treat economics/the markets/etc. Anyone who wants to discuss politics and policy should read this book. I did not really like the balance in the book - Heath really goes after the Right, while offering a bit m [...]
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Lee Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
I can't recommend this book highly enough. This guy seems to understand a lot of things, including economics, on a really deep level, and is very good at explaining them. Although the author describes himself as center-left, and his greater sympathy for liberals than conservatives is sometimes apparent in his comments, he doesn't try to score points for any "side". His clarity of thought, objectivity, and his use of conceptual tools to make complex issues easier to understand shows why philosoph [...]
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Barry Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Excellent & thought provoking. The book examines the use (and more often mis-use) of economic thought as it applies to public policy issues like health-care, taxation, welfare, trade and competition. While I don't agree with all the author's positions, and wouldn't recommend one rely on it alone (on trade, for example, again I would recommend people read Ha-Joon Chang's 'Bad Samaritans'), it is an excellent, very readable and useful text for general readers about economics and public policy [...]
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Fiona Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This book plays Devil's Advocate, taking 6 key arguments about economics from the right and then 6 key arguments from the left, and ripping them all apart. He analyses strengths and weaknesses of both positions. It was holy hell hard to read for someone who's not an economist but thrilling. I find myself mentally referring to this book often when you hear the usual blather in papers and commentary columns about politics and economics. It challenged some of my pre-conceived ideas, reinforced othe [...]
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Kevin Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Overall, this is a good book. I particularly appreciate Heath's intellectual honesty: although he is on the left, he is willing to follow the arguments where they lead. Consequently, he criticizes several ideas prominent on the left. He also, of course, criticizes several ideas on the right. So overall it is a pleasant and fairly balanced read.The major problem with the book is that he often fails to explain his arguments in sufficient detail. Given that Heath's aim is to give us a book that is [...]
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Ralique Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
In principle, this is a book that I would really enjoy- clever marketing in part of the book's subtitle. I'm sure there were some important terms discussed in the book. But if you asked me to describe a paragraph a minute after I had read it, I probably wouldn't be able to do so. Maybe it's the unappealing nature of nonfiction or the appearance of new terms every 5 words, but there's a reason why it took me a literal year to finish reading this book. With that said, I think I would keep this boo [...]
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E.A. Amant Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This book and Crisis Economics, N Roubini & S Mihm, lead me to give a detailed response of Capitalism's enemies' major points. While it is hard to love "Capitalism" and it's "Creative Destructive" components, if evolution and natural selection teach us anything, it’s that getting something for nothing is simply human sacrifice. So, if you are interested in further reading, (a refutation or counter-point if you will of these books); then see Getting Off the Junk at eastamanteastamant/articl [...]
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Robin Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
This book makes a really interesting foil to Naked Economics, which I just read. The author isn't an economist, as he points out, but he knows what he is talking about from both philosophical and public policy standpoints. This outsider perspective is part of why his ideas help cast light on some of the typical arguments that economists make. I would highly recommend this book, but I would also aadvise reading something like Naked Economics before reading this, because it will give you a better [...]
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Nicole Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Probably the best pop-economics book I've read recently. It's an easy read without condescending to the reader, and although I don't agree with all of Heath's points he supports them fairly well. It's also a surprisingly balanced book - aimed at the left, certainly, but he starts by dismantling enough arguments from the right that you can tell he's not going to be one of those people who ignores the moral dimension. Because of that, I can think of a number of people I'll be recommending this to. [...]
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Sawsee2 Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
I'm sure an economist would think this book is an easy read but I was not able to speed read it (hmmmma sign of my limited intelligence!?). The title of the book is misleading as the author is very unbiased and tends to relate facts not opinions. It had many surprising examples of economic policies that failed or flourished which I found the most interesting. I may re-read this book when I have time to absorb more of its ideas. I would be interested to hear what an economist thinks of this book. [...]
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Bob Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
Excellent and very readable. Particularly good for those who have avoided economics on the theory that it capitalism is morally doubtful. Right wingers get away with economically fallacious arguments that they probably know are wrong because so few progressives understand economics well enough to call them on it. Heath is a philosopher who understands moral qualms about capitalism, but not only equips us to criticize fallacious arguments from the right, but also self-defeating policy proposals f [...]
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Justin Douglas Aug 14, 2020 - 07:05 AM
A really challenging, but eye-opening read. The author is a philosophy professor who has taught himself economics, and is able to point out the logical fallacies of both the right and the left and refute their arguments (from the standpoint of conventional economics) with conviction. The writing is very clear and there's no fancy math involved. Anyone who wants to know more about how the economy really works, and to come up with better solutions, should start here.
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Filthy Lucre: Economics for People Who Hate Capitalism By Joseph Heath Economics is haunted by fallacies than any other study known to man Henry Hazlitt, Economics in One Lesson 1946 Every day economic claims are used by the media or in conversation to support social and political positions Those on the left tend to distrust economists, seeing them as friends of the right There is something to this, since professional economist Economics is haunted by fallacies than any other study known to man Henry Hazlitt, Economics in One Lesson 1946 Every day economic claims are used by the media or in conversation to support social and political positions Those on the left tend to distrust economists, seeing them as friends of the right There is something to this, since professional economists are almost all keen supporters of the free market Yet while factions on the right naturally embrace economists, they also tend to overestimate the effect of their support on free market policies The result is widespread confusion In fact, virtually all commonly held beliefs about economics whether espoused by political activists, politicians, journalists or taxpayers are just plain wrong.Professor Joseph Heath wants to raise our economic literacy and empower us with new ideas In Economics Without Illusions, he draws on everyday examples to skewer the six favourite economic fallacies of the right, followed by impaling the six favourite fallacies of the left Heath leaves no sacred cows untipped as he breaks down complex arguments and shows how the world really works The popularity of such books as Freakonomics and Predictably Irrational demonstrates that people want a better understanding of the financial forces that affect them Highly readable, cogently argued and certain to raise ire along all points of the socio political spectrum, Economics Without Illusions offers readers the economic literacy they need to genuinely understand and critique the pros and cons of capitalism.

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  • [PDF] · Unlimited Ý Filthy Lucre: Economics for People Who Hate Capitalism : by Joseph Heath ì
    419 Joseph Heath
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    Posted by:Joseph Heath
    Published :2020-05-02T21:48:29+00:00